Jameil Saez
Jameil Saez was born and raised on an organic produce farm in Puerto Rico and came to Washington, D.C. after finishing college. He first came in contact with NFU through an internship with the public relations department but always knew that he wanted to eventually return to farming. Jameil understands that growing up on a farm versus running a farming business is two very different things, and became interested in furthering his education through the Beginning Farmers Institute (BFI).  “I have a real passion for farming but at the same time I knew that I needed to learn the nuts and bolts of the business-side of farming in order to do it successfully,” he said. “And I was able to accomplish that through BFI.” Today, Jameil works on a two-acre farm in Hawaii while teaching agriculture classes in Molokai, Hawaii. “I want to keep farming but at the same time I’m also interested in the public policy side and educational side of farming as well,” he noted. “It’s great to connect children with our food production system so they better understand that food comes from farms and not grocery stores,” he added.
 

Jameil Saez was born and raised on an organic produce farm in Puerto Rico and came to Washington, D.C. after finishing college. He first came in contact with NFU through an internship with the public relations department but always knew that he wanted to eventually return to farming. Jameil understands that growing up on a farm versus running a farming business is two very different things, and became interested in furthering his education through the Beginning Farmers Institute (BFI).  “I have a real passion for farming but at the same time I knew that I needed to learn the nuts and bolts of the business-side of farming in order to do it successfully,” he said. “And I was able to accomplish that through BFI.” Today, Jameil works on a two-acre farm in Hawaii while teaching agriculture classes in Molokai, Hawaii. “I want to keep farming but at the same time I’m also interested in the public policy side and educational side of farming as well,” he noted. “It’s great to connect children with our food production system so they better understand that food comes from farms and not grocery stores,” he added.